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27 November 2010 @ 09:18 pm
It's pretty quiet here, but I'll try...



Anyone read this?


I just finished...Collapse )
 
 
29 November 2007 @ 11:03 am
more quotes from Bones would rain from the sky by suzanne clothier

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09 November 2007 @ 11:58 am
the book Bones Would Rain from the Sky by suzanne clothier came in at the library yesterday and i'm already 80 pages in. i think i'm going to have to buy this book because i'm so tempted to mark up nearly every page.

"an argument could be made that a failure to train a dog so that he can act appropriately is precisely a form of neglect and abuse." (p.61)

"we'd all look strangely at someone who said that their husband was a very well-behaved man at home but just too excited out in public to act politely." (p.65)

"[a dog] might report that at home, you give him loving, careful attention but that out in the world, you are highly distracted, even excitable, and he finds taking you out in public a very tiring experience." (p.65)
 
 
So I read this book recently. It was a nice 'feel-good' book. However, much of it kind of truck me as baseless, speculative pap. Anthropomorphism at its best.

Thoughts?

Has anyone read any of his other stuff?

Eg, 1995. When Elephants Weep: The Emotional Life of Animals,
The Pig Who Sang to the Moon: The Emotional World of Farm Animals.
 
 
23 January 2007 @ 08:08 pm
Just joined, as I thought it would be fun to connect with other people who enjoy books about dogs. I'm woefully behind in my dog related reading, as in the past it's been James Herriott and Jim Kjelgaard and a few dog breed type of books. Lately I've been more into fiction and horse stories, but I must say that I love John Katz's books. That link is just for A Dog Year: Twelve Months, Four Dogs and Me. I think The Dogs of Bedlam Farm: An Adventure with Sixteen Sheep, Three Dogs, Two Donkeys and Me was my favorite, but that could be because it's the first one I read and it involved living on the farm. Bedlam Farm. LOL. Aptly named, but in his books he made me laugh and cry right along with him.

Temple Grandin's book, Animals in Translation: Using the Mysteries of Autism to Decode Animal Behavior isn't solely about dogs but they are mentioned. I had picked up this book because my friend's son has autism, but this was a fascinating book about people and animals.

The only other animal book I can think of at the moment was some mystery that involved alaskan malamutes. I don't remember totally enjoying the mystery and believability part of it, but it was an interesting look into being owned by a malamute or two. *G* Unfortunately I can't think of the title or author at the moment. *g*

Anyway, I wanted to say hi and contribute a couple of books to the group. Hope to be able to contribute more in the future. ^,,^
 
 
Current Mood: bouncybouncy
Current Music: soundgarden~spoonman
 
 
 
27 July 2006 @ 12:52 pm
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/K9AmberAlert/

crossposted to all my dog groups... spread it around!!!!!
 
 
08 July 2006 @ 04:23 pm
"if you want your dog to be obedient everywhere, then train everywhere."

how simple! yet i never thought of it. again, from culture clash by jean donaldson.

so after reading this, me and puppy have started doing training by the front door with the main door open and screen door closed. talk about distracted! its been like starting over from zero, AND i need more interesting treats than normal. no wonder he would never do 'sit' for me when people came over. the whole *door open* thing blows ALL his obedience away.
 
 
07 July 2006 @ 09:35 am
i'm STILL reading this book. but i'm making progress, and i love this book.

the part i read yesterday that really stuck with me is about training.


"The first breakthrough for many dog owners is recognizing that their principle role in obedience training is to supply consequences as opposed to giving commands." (p.154)


it also talked about a comparison of trainers and nontrainers, and how trainers give much much more feedback to the dogs, 3x as much. this included praise, food reinforcements, and no reward marks (AH!AH! or too bad!). and trainers had better timing, catching the behaviors as they're starting, where the nontrainers tended to give feedback too late, sometimes 2-3 behaviors later (sit, look at a passing dog, stand to go towards the other dog, then the treat comes). the study included some highly trained dogs with nontrainers, and the trained dogs stopped responding to the nontrainers because the feedback wasnt enough and wasnt contingent on their behavior.

theres soooo many lovely things in this book. i wish i'd read it a long time ago.
 
 
22 June 2006 @ 12:42 pm
Hi, I'm a new member. =) I really like reading books about dogs to further my knowledge... plus I'm borderline obsessed with my dogs! My boys are Gonzo & Fozzie. Gonzo is an almost-5-year-old Border Collie, Fozzie is a 4 month-old Corgi mix pup, both are from rescue. They are the BEST! I'm Erica, a 17 year-old from Northern Cali. I'd love to be a dog trainer someday, in Obedience & dog sports, so I read tons of training books. I also love reading Raw & BARF books, because I feed my dogs a raw diet.



I was curious, does the club ever read Raw books? They're some of my favorites. There isn't a ton of "dialogue" or action or anything, but lots of Raw books can be so informative and interesting. If I could recommend a book, I'd recommend a bunch of Raw books, especially "Give Your Dog A Bone" by Dr. Ian Billinghurst.